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Learn more about how the semaglutide portfolio allows you to address patients’ specific needs in obesity and type 2 diabetes.

RYBELSUS® (semaglutide tablets) is the only GLP-1 RA in a pill, which can deliver HbA1c reduction with the added benefit of weight loss, helping your patients to reduce the risk of complications associated with type 2 diabetes.

Up to 50% of people diagnosed with type 2 diabetes delay starting on insulin1* for more than 2 years2 after it’s recommended.
 
But, with 30 million people with type 2 diabetes worldwide having already taken the positive step to start insulin therapy when it’s needed,3† there are actually 30 million reasons for your patients to say ‘yes’ to insulin.
An early SHIFT in treatment could change lives

When it comes to treating type 2 diabetes, there are more options available than ever before. But a SHIFT in treatment towards early and intensive HbA1c control can reduce the risks associated with type 2 diabetes and help your patients avoid long term complications.4-6

Connecting medical professionals with useful tools to manage obesity effectively.

Explore a series of articles covering the link between obesity and cardiovascular disease (CVD), the global burden of CVD and the residual CVD risk rising from obesity.9

1.

Rubino A, et al. Delayed initiation of subcutaneous insulin therapy after failure of oral glucose-lowering agents in patients with Type 2 diabetes: a population-based analysis in the UK. Diabet Med. 2007;24:1412–1418.

2.

Hosomura N, et al. Decline of insulin therapy and delays in insulin initiation in people with uncontrolled diabetes mellitus. Diabet Med. 2017;34:1599–1602.

3.

Basu S, et al. Estimation of global insulin use for type 2 diabetes, 2018-30: a microsimulation analysis. Lancet Diabetes Endocrinol. 2019;7(S1):25–33 

4.

Dalsgaard N, Vilsbøll T, Knop FK. Effects of glucagon-like peptide receptor agonists on cardiovascular risk factors: A Narrative review of head-to-head comparisons. Diabetes Obes Metab. 2018;20;508-19.

5.

Nauck MA,, Quast DR, Wefers J. et al. GLP-1 receptor agonists in the treatment of type 2 diabetes – state-of-the-art. Mol Metab. 2021;46:101-102.

6.

Lovshin JA. Glucagon-like Peptide-1 Receptor Agonists: A class update for treating Type 2 Diabetes. Can J Diabetes. 2017;41:523-35.

7.

Wegovy® [summary of product characteristics]. Bagsværd, Denmark: Novo Nordisk A/S; 2023.

8.

Garvey WT, Batterham RL, Bhatta M, et al. Two-year effects of semaglutide in adults with overweight or obesity: the STEP 5 trial. Nat Med. 2022;28(10):2083-2091.

9.

Global Burden of Cardiovascular Diseases and Risk Factors, 1990–2019. Update From the GBD 2019 Study. J Am Coll Cardiol. 2020 Dec.76(25)2982–3021. Doi: 10.1016/j.jacc.2020.11.010.

*After failure of non-insulin glucose-lowering medications.1
In a microsimulation of type 2 diabetes burden from 2018 to 2030 across 221 countries, it was estimated that the number of people with type 2 diabetes globally utilising insulin in 2018 was 30,229,435.3

1.

Rubino A, et al. Delayed initiation of subcutaneous insulin therapy after failure of oral glucose-lowering agents in patients with Type 2 diabetes: a population-based analysis in the UK. Diabet Med. 2007;24:1412–1418.

2.

Hosomura N, et al. Decline of insulin therapy and delays in insulin initiation in people with uncontrolled diabetes mellitus. Diabet Med. 2017;34:1599–1602.

3.

Basu S, et al. Estimation of global insulin use for type 2 diabetes, 2018-30: a microsimulation analysis. Lancet Diabetes Endocrinol. 2019;7(S1):25–33 

4.

Dalsgaard N, Vilsbøll T, Knop FK. Effects of glucagon-like peptide receptor agonists on cardiovascular risk factors: A Narrative review of head-to-head comparisons. Diabetes Obes Metab. 2018;20;508-19.

5.

Nauck MA,, Quast DR, Wefers J. et al. GLP-1 receptor agonists in the treatment of type 2 diabetes – state-of-the-art. Mol Metab. 2021;46:101-102.

6.

Lovshin JA. Glucagon-like Peptide-1 Receptor Agonists: A class update for treating Type 2 Diabetes. Can J Diabetes. 2017;41:523-35.

9.

Global Burden of Cardiovascular Diseases and Risk Factors, 1990–2019. Update From the GBD 2019 Study. J Am Coll Cardiol. 2020 Dec.76(25)2982–3021. Doi: 10.1016/j.jacc.2020.11.010.

*After failure of non-insulin glucose-lowering medications.1
In a microsimulation of type 2 diabetes burden from 2018 to 2030 across 221 countries, it was estimated that the number of people with type 2 diabetes globally utilising insulin in 2018 was 30,229,435.3